Stories
Sunday, October 15, 2017
By Terrill Bodner Photography

Fall, my favourite time of year, is here again! And it's time for some football. For the past seven years I have photographed minor and high school players and watched so many of them grow up and graduate! There's always a fresh crop of little guys eager to learn the game. Here's a few shots of one minor team, aptly named "Outlaws". It's always a challenge to race along the sidelines with them as the ball carrier heads to the goal line. Sometimes I manage to capture them crossing the line, but it's the journey that is most important in life, and football teaches that along with teamwork and cooperation.

Sometimes we have to struggle alone to reach our goals too. That's what makes us stronger and more confident that we can do whatever we set our hearts and minds to do.

Breaking away from the pack, being protected by your teammates, it's a rush to the end zone! I love to see the determination in their eyes. Focusing on the goal line gets this player there.

Sometimes we stumble, get caught up and thrown to the ground. Even stomped on, but that doesn't stop these players from picking themselves up and carrying on in the next play. Second chances in life are worth taking.

There are times we all need a little help pushing through.

And sometimes it's just a chance to enjoy life, celebrate the victories, and learn from the defeats.

Terrill Bodner, MPA is an Accredited Professional Photographer living in Prince George, BC, specializing in Real Estate, Contemporary, and Fine Art photography. Terrill is a member of Professional Photographers of Canada, accredited in Fine Art/Photo Decor, Animals, Wildlife, Nature, Ornithology/Bird, Botanical, Pictorial/Scenic, and Travel Illustration photography and holds the designation of Master of Photographic Arts from Professional Photographers of Canada.
 She shoots in studio and on location. Come on in and snoop around!

 
Thursday, August 24, 2017
By Terrill Bodner Photography

Headshots for Business or Pleasure...

 
Sunday, August 13, 2017
By Terrill Bodner Photography

Driving through Gros Morne National Park we came across a little road leading to Rickie's Cove. While meandering along the road by the beach on a sunny day I spotted the remnants of an old boat in the grass surrounded by dandelions. Peaceful resting spot, not just for us, but for this once-serviceable watercraft. The few small cabins along the road appeared deserted, a few boats tied to the wharf (photo below). Not even a dog in sight. Perhaps it is only used in summer. I couldn't even find it on a map.

Driving north to St. Anthony, along mostly desolate territory spewed with rocks and scraggy trees, there were a few points of interest. The green-grey look of the water and trees made the boat very noticeable as we drove by. Rob pulled over so I could hop out and walk back to get my shot as he turned the car around. It was a good 100 feet or more I had to cover, and my only thought was "I hope a moose doesn't come crashing out of the bushes in front of me!" Or maybe I was secretly hoping one would! Wouldn't that be a shot to remember?

This old rust bucket had a few interesting angles for me to photograph. I loved the tires still hanging onto the side. No one was around so we pulled over so I could take the shots from different angles before heading to the Rose-Blanche Lighthouse, east of Channel-Port-Aux-Basques.

On Western Brook Pond, we took the Bon Tours boat tour in Gros Morne National Park. A nice little jaunt (45-minutes one way) to the lake, over bog and through the forest, and we arrived at Western Brook Pond fjord. Situated in the Long Range Mountains, the northernmost extent of the Appalachians, we could see the glacially-carved land-locked fjord. This 16 kilometre lake with a depth of 165 metres is home to Atlantic Salmon, Brook Trout, and Arctic Char, as well as an unusual colony of cliff nesting gulls. The waterfalls, many over 2000 feet high, were spectacular. (Boats above and below.)

Near Torbay, we stopped to watch the fishermen throwing out their traps. Overlooking the bay was a section of the East Coast Trail, so I took a stroll along the cliff just to say I was on it. Another trip will have to be planned to hike the East Coast Trail. But after I retire because it's a long one, 540 Km! The West Coast Trail was only 75 km, which I hiked one week in 2008, but this one might take all summer. We shall see.

A little place called Flower Cove...and of course, I found a boat!

L'Anse Au Clair, Labrador in the wee hours of the morning...

Terrill Bodner, MPA is an Accredited Professional Photographer living in Prince George, BC, specializing in Real Estate, Contemporary, and Fine Art photography. Terrill is a member of Professional Photographers of Canada, accredited in Fine Art/Photo Decor, Animals, Wildlife, Nature, Ornithology/Bird, Botanical, Pictorial/Scenic, and Travel Illustration photography and holds the designation of Master of Photographic Arts from Professional Photographers of Canada.
 She shoots in studio and on location. Come on in and snoop around!

 
Sunday, August 13, 2017
By Terrill Bodner Photography

A beautiful sunrise in L'Anse Au Clair, Labrador. Not a soul around at 5:30 in the morning, except me, of course. I took off down the road in our rental to where we spotted the iceberg as we arrived the night before. As the sun peaked over the outcropping on the eastern side of the bay, I set up my tripod and camera and started to capture some images. As the shadows danced across the iceberg I continued to shoot, knowing I would never be satisfied with my first few shots.I was pleased to have captured the shots at sea level. All it needed was a whale to swim by! Just wishful thinking...

After I was satisfied with my shots of the iceberg in the harbour in L'Anse Au Clair, I wandered towards the boat I had seen as I arrived. I stopped when I saw the old rusty anchor resting on the rocks...what stories it could tell, I thought as I set my tripod up to frame my next shot. With the iceberg now in the background, the foreground of anchor and rocks framed it nicely.

I was hoping to find some bergy-bits along the shore but the sandbar was too far out and the tide was coming in, filling up a little channel I would have to cross.

Lastly, the boat. I like boats. To see more boats, sail on over to the next blog post.

Terrill Bodner, MPA is an Accredited Professional Photographer living in Prince George, BC, specializing in Real Estate, Contemporary, and Fine Art photography. Terrill is a member of Professional Photographers of Canada, accredited in Fine Art/Photo Decor, Animals, Wildlife, Nature, Ornithology/Bird, Botanical, Pictorial/Scenic, and Travel Illustration photography and holds the designation of Master of Photographic Arts from Professional Photographers of Canada.
 She shoots in studio and on location. Come on in and snoop around!

 
Monday, August 07, 2017
By Terrill Bodner Photography

On my birthday we arrived in the town of St. Anthony at the northern tip of western Newfoundland. While checking out the Fishing Point Lighthouse at the end of Fishing Point Road we spotted a tour boat coming back into the harbour. Rob did his research on Northland Discovery Boat Tours who had a truck parked in the parking lot while I was photographing the lighthouse (pictured above and below). One of the owners was watching the boat arrive and we were lucky enough to have tickets booked right there for the 9 am sailing in the morning! What a great birthday present!

St. Anthony or "Sant Nee" as the locals say, is a small town on the northern tip on the western side of Newfoundland. Icebergs float down from Greenland and move along Iceberg Alley passing by every spring. These icebergs were slowly melting away. Only the tip of the iceberg shows, leaving about 1/8 or 1/9 above water. As they are tossed about in the ocean pieces fall, changing the look of it. This one has a waterline mark along it where the waved eroded it away before it balanced itself in a different position. To me, these are not huge chunks of ancient ice. They are northern dancers, twirling and spinning their way until they are exhausted. Amazing to think that they would be gone in another month. As we were heading back to the harbour I couldn't help but look back to get another shot. The light on this iceberg cast reflections on the ripples of the ocean. So gorgeous out on the water on such a calm day. 

One of the coolest things we did was taste an iceberg. And not just an ordinary iceberg that would be over 10,000 years old, but the vein of an iceberg! This chunk of ice was from a blue stripe in a nearby iceberg. The blue veins are created when cracks in the iceberg fills with melt water that freezes. A few iceberg facts are on Northland Discovery Boat Tours website.

Our tour guides expertly maneuvered the boat so that we could watch and photograph the whales as they came to the surface. With caplin so abundant in the water, the humpback whales would be fattening up for their next trip to the Dominican. This was my first whale I have seen up close, and what a thrill! The tail flip is an indication that the whale is going for a deep dive and will be back later. Kind of like a 'see ya later' wave, I thought. (Humpback photo above, below.) We were lucky to have sailed on a calm and partly cloudy day. As we headed back, I spotted the first fin whale of the season!

Terrill Bodner, MPA is an Accredited Professional Photographer living in Prince George, BC, specializing in Real Estate, Contemporary, and Fine Art photography. Terrill is a member of Professional Photographers of Canada, accredited in Fine Art/Photo Decor, Animals, Wildlife, Nature, Ornithology/Bird, Botanical, Pictorial/Scenic, and Travel Illustration photography and holds the designation of Master of Photographic Arts from Professional Photographers of Canada.
 She shoots in studio and on location. Come on in and snoop around!

 
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